Barr empowered prosecutors to investigate alleged election irregularities

Barr empowered prosecutors to investigate alleged election irregularities
US NEWS

US Attorney General William Barr has authorized the nation’s federal prosecutors to investigate “material allegations” of voting irregularities before the presidential election is certified.

Barr made this decision a few days after the media declared Democrat Joe Biden the winner of the fight for the White House. The Attorney General’s move increases the likelihood that President Donald Trump will use the Justice Department to try to challenge such an outcome.

Barr’s decision gives prosecutors an opportunity to disregard long-standing Justice Department policies that routinely prohibit such open action until the vote is officially certified.

Trump did not admit defeat, and instead announced the existence of a large-scale Democratic conspiracy, spanning several states, to distort the vote in Biden’s favor.

The Democrats called these accusations completely unfounded.

In a memorandum sent to federal prosecutors and made available to the Associated Press, Barr indicated that investigations “can only be conducted if there are clear and seemingly credible allegations of wrongdoing that, if confirmed, could potentially affect the outcome of federal elections in a separate state ”.

Former Vice President Joe Biden’s headquarters lawyer Bob Bauer said on Monday that “it is deeply regrettable that Attorney General Barr has decided to issue a memorandum that will only facilitate the dissemination of“ misleading, speculative, fanciful, or far-fetched statements, ”from which, according to his claims he defends. “

“These are the very statements that the president and his lawyers make unsuccessfully every day, while their claims are laughed at in one court after another,” Bauer said. “But ultimately American democracy is stronger than any clumsy and cynical party political machinations.”

States must resolve electoral differences, including recounts and litigation, by December 8th. The members of the Electoral College meet on December 14 for a final debriefing.

Meanwhile, President Trump’s campaign team has filed a federal lawsuit in an attempt to prevent the Pennsylvania government from certifying Joe Biden’s victory.

The lawsuit, filed by the headquarters and two registered voters, alleges that the Pennsylvania mail-order system allegedly “lacked all the transparency and scrutiny that those who vote at the polling station go through.”

The lawsuit alleges that the state authorities violated the US Constitution by creating an “illegal two-tiered voting system” in which personal voting was subject to more scrutiny than mail-order voting.

President Trump, who for months tried to sow doubts about the election results by claiming alleged fraud, has pledged to pursue a strategy of challenging the results of the vote that he hopes will lead to their cancellation.

Trump’s campaign headquarters and Republicans have filed many lawsuits since election day over alleged fraud. Judges in Georgia and Michigan have already refused to consider the claims.

Some Republican lawmakers in the Pennsylvania legislature noted in a press release circulated that they “are calling for a legislative audit of the 2020 elections and requiring that election results not be confirmed until the audit is complete.”

Edward Foley of the Ohio State University College of Law, who specializes in electoral law, said the Pennsylvania legislature cannot stop voting certification without changing the law.

“To do this, they will have to try to change the state law, and it will be vetoed by the Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania,” Fowley said.

The lawsuit from Trump’s Pennsylvania campaign will be heard by District Judge Matthew Brann, who was appointed by former President Barack Obama.

Attorney General of Pennsylvania Democrat Josh Shapiro called the lawsuit unfounded.

“I am confident that Pennsylvania law will be upheld and the will of the residents [штата]expressed in these elections will be respected, ”he said.

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